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Tailored Nutrition Research

The Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases at Schneider Children's has initiated research aimed at examining tailored nutrition for children influenced by intestinal bacteria
Date: 18.11.18 | Update: 04.12.18

The Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases at Schneider Children's has initiated research aimed at children, and is a continuation of innovative research done at the Weizmann Institute where it was found that body glucose reaction to different foods is individual and influenced by intestinal bacteria.

Intestinal bacteria in the body are responsible for normal general functioning, for the risk of morbidity and for food breakdown. There are billions of various bacteria in the human body with a different composition in each one of us. The planned research will study how foods influence the level of glucose (adults each have a different and individual signature of "good" and "bad" foods that are not necessarily what we think they are) and therefore, how bacteria influence the level of glucose in children's bodies. Additionally, the research will test whether "Mediterranean" nutrition is preferable for children or whether there are children who may enjoy such a diet, or others who would prefer another menu. Individual nutritional plans will be recommended to children based on the findings.

The personal recommendations will help children to maintain a balanced blood glucose level and reduce negative influences that lead to sensations of hunger, weight gain, heightened risk for diabetes, hypertension, fatty liver, heart disease, and more.


The Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases seeks children aged 6-9 for the individually tailored Mediterranean nutrition study. Participation includes a 24/7 connection to a glucose monitor, providing blood, urine and fecal samples during the two-week period of study.

Prof. Raanan Shamir, Director of the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases, notes that "this research is the first of its kind in the world, and just as research among adults changes the worldview of tailored nutrition for adults, I believe that the study will change the worldview for children's nutrition and contribute to the health of the participants in the short term and to children in general in the long term."

Further details and registration - the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases, Reut Klein reutkl@clalit.org.il, or 03-9253039.

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